Tech in the News: The Syria – North Korea Connection and What it Means for Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation

Margaret Kosal

Posted February 27, 2018

Margaret Kosal, associate professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Institute of Technology, appeared on CNN International, Tuesday, February 27, for an interview on the Syria – North Korea connection and what it means for weapons of mass destruction (WMD) proliferation. Kosal talked about the implications that Syria is attempting to restart its chemical weapons production capabilities, including possibly for nerve agents with the help of North Korea based on findings in a United Nations (UN) report.

Excerpt:

For those who have long watched North Korea and its behavior internationally of ignoring international law and pursuing arms trade, this is not unexpected. This may be a real test for the Chemical Weapons Convention and the international community. So far there have been no significant consequences for the Syrian regime for their ongoing violations of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). There’s no evidence that the Syrian regime is worried about international inspectors, the area is not accessible to inspectors, and the Syrian regimes seems to be unconcerned even if international observers had access to the area. They are protected by their allies, Russia and Iran.

Kosal also noted that while all responsibility for chemical weapons use firmly lays with Syria and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), on the U.S. side, our diplomats need to be empowered and supported. The U.S. needs to be engaged diplomatically.

The Sam Nunn School of International Affairs is part of the Georgia Tech Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts.