Alasdair Young

Professor and Co-Director for the Center for European and Transatlantic Studies

Member Of:
  • School of International Affairs
Fax Number:
404-894-1900
Office Location:
Habersham 212B
Overview

Alasdair Young is Professor of International Affairs.  He co-directs the Center for European and Transatlantic Studies, a Jean Monnet Center of Excellence. He held a Jean Monnet Chair (2012-15) and received the Ivan Allen College’s Distinguished Researcher Award in 2015.  Beyond Georgia Tech, he is co-editor of JCMS: Journal of Common Market Studies and was chair of the European Union Studies Association (USA) (2015-17).   Before joining Georgia Tech in 2011 he taught at the University of Glasgow in the UK for 10 years.  Prior to that he held research posts at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy, and the University of Sussex, outside Brighton in the UK.

Alasdair has written four books, including The New Politics of Trade: Lessons from TTIP (Agenda Publishing, 2018) and  Parochial Global Europe: 21st Century Trade Politics with John Peterson (Edinburgh) (Oxford University Press, 2014). He has edited 13 other volumes, including Triangular Diplomacy among the European Union, the United States and the Russian Federation: Responses to Crisis in Ukraine with Vicki Brichfield (PalgraveMacmillan, 2018); the seventh edition of Policy-Making in the European Union with Mark Pollack and Helen Wallace (Oxford University Press, 2015) and a special issue of the Journal of European Public Policy on the European Union as a global regulator (Vol. 22/9, 2015). He has published more than a dozen articles -- including in Global Environmental Politics, the Journal of Common Market Studies, the Journal of European Public Policy, the Review of International Political Economy, and World Politics -- and written more than 30 book chapters.  He was editor of the British Political Studies Association journal POLITICS (2006-11) and the JCMS Annual Review of the European Union (2006-8).   He has performed consultancy work for the American and British governments and for the European Commission. 

Education:
  • DPhil, University of Sussex
  • MIA, Columbia University
  • BA, University of Pennsylvania
Interests
Research Fields:
  • International Trade
Geographic
Focuses:
  • Europe
  • Europe - United Kingdom
  • United States
Issues:
  • Environment
  • Globalization and Localization
  • International Trade and Investment
  • Regulation
Courses
  • INTA-2001: Careers In Intl Affairs
  • INTA-2221: Politics of the EU
  • INTA-3044: Global Politics of Tech
  • INTA-3223: Transatlantic Relations
  • INTA-3301: Int'l Political Econ
  • INTA-4500: INTA Pro-Seminar
  • INTA-4740: Sem-Political Economy
Selected Publications

Books

Journal Articles

  • Not your parents’ trade politics: The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership negotiations
       In: Review of International Political Economy [Peer Reviewed]

    2016

  • Europe's Influence on Foreign Rules: Conditions, Context and Comparison
       In: Journal of European Public Policy [Peer Reviewed]

    2015

  • Liberalizing trade, not exporting rules: the limits to regulatory co-ordination in the EU's ‘new generation’ preferential trade agreements
       In: Journal of European Public Policy [Peer Reviewed]

    2015

    © 2015 Taylor & Francis.The European Union (EU) is considered both an influential global regulator and a trade power. There is thus a common, if rather casual, assumption that the EU exports its regulations through preferential trade agreements (PTAs). Based on a close textual analysis of four early ‘new generation’ PTAs – those with Canada, Central America, Singapore and South Korea – and the Commission's opening position in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership negotiations, this contribution challenges that assumption. Across a broad spectrum of regulatory issues there has been very limited regulatory co-ordination. Moreover, where it has occurred, it has focused on establishing the equivalence of different rules or on convergence based on international, not European, standards. This contribution thus demonstrates that the EU has not exported its regulations through ‘new generation’ PTAs. Moreover, it contends that the EU has not really tried to. It speculates that the EU has not sought to export aggressively its rules through new generation PTAs because of concern that opposition to regulatory change in its partners would jeopardize agreements that would benefit European firms.

Recent Publications

Books

Journal Articles

Chapters

All Publications

Books

Journal Articles

Chapters